iConference 2019 Papers Finalists Announced: Lee Dirks Award winner to receive $5,000

 

Award finalists have been announced for iConference 2019 full and short research papers. The finalists are listed below and also on the conference website. Winners will be announced at iConference 2019, which takes place March 31 – April 3 in Washington DC.

Best Full Research Paper

The winning paper in the full research category will receive the Lee Dirks Award for Best Paper. This award includes a $5,000 prize, funded this year by Emerald Publishing. The winner will be announced in the conference’s opening plenary on Monday, April 1. The finalists are listed here alphabetically by title:

Title: Algorithmic Management and Algorithmic Competencies: Understanding and Appropriating Algorithms in Gig work
Authors: Mohammad Hossein Jarrahi, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Will Sutherland, University of Washington
Presentation: Papers 17: Algorithms at Work, Tuesday, April 2, 1:30-3:30pm

Title: Documenting the Undocumented: Privacy and Security Guidelines for Humanitarian Work with Irregular Migrants
Authors: Sara Vannini, University of Washington; Ricardo Gomez, University of Washington; Bryce Clayton Newell, University of Kentucky
Presentation: Papers 7: Collecting Data about Vulnerable Populations, Monday, April 1, 1:30-3:00pm

Title: The Innovation Ecology: Collaborative Information, Community Support, and Policy in A Creative Technology Community
Authors: Guo Freeman, Clemson University; Jeffrey Bardzell, Indiana University; Shaowen Bardzell, Indiana University; Nathan J McNeese, Clemson University
Presentation: Papers 18: Innovation and Professionalization in Technology Communities, Tuesday, April 2, 1:30-3:00pm

Title: Understanding Change in a Dynamic Complex Digital Object: Reading Categories of Change out of Patch Notes Documents
Authors: Ayse Gursoy, University of Texas at Austin; Karen M. Wickett, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Melanie Feinberg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Presentation: Papers 12: Digital Libraries, Curation and Preservation, Monday, April 1, 3:30-5:00pm

Title: Understanding the Role of Privacy and Trust in Intelligent Personal Assistant Adoption
Authors: Yuting Liao, University of Maryland, College Park; Jessica Vitak, University of Maryland, College Park; Priya Kumar, University of Maryland, College Park; Michael Zimmer, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Katherine Kritikos, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Presentation: Papers 3: Concerns about “Smart” Interactions and Privacy, Monday, April 1, 10:30am-12:00pm

Best Short Research Paper

Finalists in the Short Research Paper category are listed below, alphabetically by title. The winner will be announced in the conference’s Tuesday plenary.

Title: Characterizing Same Work Relationships in Large-Scale Digital Libraries
Authors: Peter Organisciak, University of Denver; Summer Shetenhelm, University of Denver; Danielle Francisco Albuquerque Vasques, University of Denver; Krystyna Matusiak, University of Denver
Presentation: Papers 12: Digital Libraries, Curation and Preservation, Monday, April 1, 3:30-5:00pm

Title: Illegal Aliens or Undocumented Immigrants? Towards the Automated Identification of Bias by Word Choice and Labeling
Authors: Felix Hamborg, University of Konstanz; Anastasia Zhukova, University of Konstanz; Bela Gipp, University of Wuppertal
Presentation: Papers 6: Limits and Affordances of Automation, Monday, April 1, 1:30-3:00pm

Title: Looking for Group: Live Streaming Programming for Small Audiences
Authors: Travis Faas, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis; Lynn Dombrowski, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis; Erin Brady, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis; Andrew Miller, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis
Presentation: Papers 4: Identity Questions in Online Communities, Monday, April 1, 10:30am-12:00pm

Title: Proposing “Mobile, Finance, and Information” Toolkit for Financial Inclusion of the Poor in Developing Countries
Authors: Devendra Potnis, University of Tennessee at Knoxville; Bhak Gala, Central University of Gujarat
Presentation: Papers 7: Collecting Data about Vulnerable Populations, Monday, April 1, 1:30-3:00pm

Title: Public-Private Partnerships in Data Services: Learning From Genealogy
Authors: Kalpana Shankar, University College Dublin; Kristin Eschenfelder, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Laurie Buchholz, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Christine Cullen, University College Dublin
Presentation: Papers 14: Data and Information in the Public Sphere, Tuesday, April 2, 10:30am-12:00pm

Finalists were selected by an awards jury overseen by 2019 Papers Chairs Aleksandra Sarcevic of Drexel University and Nicholas Weber of the University of Washington. The organizers of iConference 2019 congratulate all honorees.

iConferernce 2019 will take place March 31 – April 3 in Washington DC. The schedule is available online and we are currently accepting registrartions. All accepted papers will be published in Springer’s Lecture Notes in Computer Science.

iConference 2019 is presented by the iSchool at the University of Maryland, College Park in collaboration with the Syracuse University iSchool and the iSchool at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Sponsors include the Emerald Publishing, Computing Research Association, Elsevier, MDPI, ALISE, NVivo, University of British Columbia, University of Pittsburgh, University of Kentucky, National Taiwan University, and Springer.

An annual presentation of the iSchools organization since 2005, the iConference brings together scholars and researchers from around the world to examine critical information issues in contemporary society. The iConference is open to any and all information scholars and researchers, regardless of institutional affiliation. An openness to new ideas and research fields in information science is a primary characteristics of the event. Attendance has grown every year; participants appreciate the inspiring sense of community, high quality research presentations, and myriad opportunities for engagement and networking.

 

Maryland iSchool researchers link virtual reality with sight and smell to better understand data

 

Imagine running through a dark forest in a virtual reality video game and being able to smell the crisp scent of pine needles all around you. Or what if you were analyzing a complex data set, and could associate specific scents with data points in order to better track and recall the information?

University of Maryland researchers in the Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL) are linking virtual reality with sight and smell to help people better process information. HCIL is jointly supported by the UMD iSchool and the UMD Institute for Advanced Computer Studies.

HCIM student, Biswaksen Patnaik and PhD student, Andrea Batch are exploring ways to convey information with scent as a complement to the visual representation of data sets.

Patnaik and Batch recently presented their research paper, “Information Olfaction,” which explores the sense of smell combined with information visualization at IEEE VIS in Berlin, the largest and most important conference on Scientific Visualization, Information Visualization and Visual Analytics.

“This was easily our most crazy idea to date,” said Niklas Elmqvist, HCIL director. Elmqvist is also the student’s adviser and co-author of the research paper.

Click here for more on this story.

 

UMD iSchool’s Data Challenge 2018 draws 150 enthusiastic participants to weeklong event

 

On the morning of February 24, 2018, over 150 enthusiastic students from different colleges around the University of Maryland gathered with experts from the Digital Curation Innovation Center (DCIC) and other sponsoring organizations at the UMD Riggs Alumni Center for the UMD iSchool Data Challenge 2018 event. The students embarked on an exciting week-long journey of problem-solving, number crunching, and data-wrangling to provide data analytics and digital curation ideas with a theme of Information Innovation for Social Good. The excitement was evident as participants were lined up at the entrance before the registration officially opened. During the event, there was constant activity with mentors assisting teams, encouraging them to come up with innovative ideas using the data they had chosen to work with.

The DCIC provided 3 datasets for students to work on and enhance their digital curation, user experience and data analytical skills. The datasets focused on historical, cultural and human justice collections. DCIC Director Richard Marciano and Software Architect Greg Jansen participated in the event as mentors and inspired participants to leverage the datasets and combined with their knowledge of the ever-advancing technology to provide results that will empower the community. Student teams were encouraged to extract insights from the data and create interesting narratives.

With overwhelming student participation, motivation from the mentors, a chance to interact with key industry experts, and scrumptious food, it was a splendid kick-start for the first ever UMD iSchool Data Challenge.

After a week of problem-solving, number crunching and data-wrangling, the Finale of the Data Challenge took place on the morning of March 3 at the University of Maryland. The judges were quite impressed with how well the students had leveraged technology and provided data as well as abided by the theme of Information Innovation for Social Good. One of the judges, Ying Lu, a Data Scientist at Google, shared that he was highly impressed by the winners of the Social Impact category, who had utilized the Morten Beyer and Agnew Aircraft data to study the carbon footprints left by the airplanes.

It was exciting to see several teams of undergraduate students participating in this event and showcasing their skills at such a major event. One of the undergraduate teams that really impressed all judges used data from the DCIC’s Mapping Inequality project, that focused on racial zoning as a result of the 1929 stock market crash that devastated America’s economy. The Home Owner’s Loan Corporation (HOLC), created by President Franklin Roosevelt, created maps that graded neighborhoods based on racial/ethic presence, high and low-income families and environmental problems and made financial decisions based on them. In this study, the team of students analyzed the level of vulnerability of American families based on several variables and highlighted a geographic trend between those of whom benefited and suffered the most. Among security grade ranking, they found that the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania had the strongest ranking, while Vinton, Virginia had the lowest. They also found that the HOLC did discriminate against low-income and minority families, and foreign and negro inhabitants when evaluating the distribution of economic relief.

Overall the participants enjoyed working on the datasets, the mentors cherished guiding the students, the judges appreciated the hard work of the teams and the sponsors too enjoyed interacting with the participants – the event was a hit!

Click here for more information about the Data Challenge; click here to learn more about the DCIC.